9-11 September 2019
Europe/Lisbon timezone

Printing in Linux as of today

10 Sep 2019, 10:00
20m
Opala/room-I&II (Corinthia Hotel Lisbon)

Opala/room-I&II

Corinthia Hotel Lisbon

126

Speakers

Aveek Basu Till Kamppeter

Description

Today’s is a scenario when we can not think of having either a mobile phone or a laptop or a tablet. With the progress of technology and having all these handheld devices, we have been able to get many of our documents digitized. However, whatever advancements we see in this space of documentation, it is still very hard to find someone who did not have the need to print or scan a hard copy. Even today a critical agreement gets signed over a hard copy so do most of our banking documents or promo advertisements in a supermarket.

The OpenPrinting (OP) organization works on the development of new printing architectures, technologies, printing infrastructure, and interface standards for Linux and UNIX-style operating systems. OP collaborates with the IEEE-ISTO Printer Working Group (PWG) on IPP projects.
We maintains cups-filters which allows CUPS to be used on any Unix-based (non-macOS) system. OpenPrinting maintains the Foomatic database which is a database-driven system for integrating free software printer drivers with CUPS under Unix. It supports every free software printer driver known to us and every printer known to work with these drivers.

OpenPrinting has been doing a commendable job in improving the way the world prints on a UNIX based system. The projects that we maintain are taken up by almost all the Linux distributions and most recently Google Chrome OS. It is also used by most of the printer manufacturers to support printing. Today it is very hard to think about printing in these OSs without the involvement of OpenPrinting. We have been successful in implementing the driverless printing following the IPP standards proposed by the PWG. Because of that, today someone can think of printing from a Linux box by just connecting a printer over network or USB. Now using a printer has become as simple as using a thumb drive.

A short showcase on printing in Linux.

Presentation Materials